tahiti

Want to discover what are the best islands in Tahiti?

Tahiti, renowned for its paradisiacal beauty, is a dream destination for travelers seeking tropical bliss.

Let’s embark on a journey to discover the allure of Tahitian islands and their captivating charm.

Tahiti, the largest island in French Polynesia, beckons with its lush landscapes, turquoise waters, and vibrant culture.

Its main island, divided into Tahiti Nui and Tahiti Iti, offers a perfect blend of natural wonders and cultural richness.

The Tahitian islands hold a special place in the hearts of travelers worldwide, offering an escape to paradise unlike any other.

With their pristine beaches, crystal-clear lagoons, and diverse marine life, these islands epitomize the essence of tropical paradise.

From luxury resorts to eco-friendly retreats, Tahiti’s islands cater to every traveler’s dream, making it a sought-after destination for romantic getaways, adventurous explorations, and serene retreats.

Now let’s take a closer look at the 10 best islands in Tahiti:

1. Tahiti

Tahiti

Tahiti, the largest island in French Polynesia, captivates visitors with its breathtaking beauty and rich cultural heritage. Let’s explore the essence of this iconic destination.

Tahiti, comprised of two main sections, Tahiti Nui and Tahiti Iti, is located in the heart of the South Pacific Ocean.

Tahiti Nui, the larger portion, boasts majestic mountains, lush valleys, and cascading waterfalls, while Tahiti Iti offers rugged landscapes and secluded beaches.

Together, they form a paradise that stretches over 1,000 square kilometers.

Tahiti is adorned with a myriad of attractions that appeal to every traveler.

Papeete, the vibrant capital city, offers bustling markets, museums, and historical sites that showcase Tahiti’s unique culture and heritage.

The lush valleys of Papenoo Valley and Faarumai Valley entice hikers and nature enthusiasts with their scenic trails and tropical landscapes.

Don’t miss the iconic black sand beaches of Matavai Bay and Teahupo’o, renowned for their beauty and surf breaks that attract surfers from around the world.

Visitors to Tahiti can indulge in a plethora of activities that showcase the island’s natural wonders and cultural treasures.

Snorkeling and diving enthusiasts can explore vibrant coral reefs and encounter exotic marine life in the crystal-clear lagoons.

Adventurers can embark on 4×4 safaris, horseback riding tours, and waterfall hikes to discover the island’s hidden gems and breathtaking vistas.

For a taste of Tahitian culture, attend traditional dance performances, sample local cuisine at food trucks and restaurants, and immerse yourself in the warmth and hospitality of the Tahitian people.

2. Moorea

Moorea

Moorea, often referred to as the “Magical Island,” enchants visitors with its stunning landscapes and relaxed atmosphere. Let’s delve into the allure of Moorea.

Moorea, located just a short ferry ride from Tahiti, is a tropical paradise renowned for its dramatic peaks, pristine beaches, and vibrant coral reefs.

Spanning over 130 square kilometers, Moorea offers a compact yet diverse landscape that captivates travelers from around the world.

Moorea boasts an array of attractions and points of interest that showcase its natural beauty and cultural heritage.

The Belvedere Lookout provides panoramic views of the island’s lush valleys, crystal-clear lagoons, and towering peaks, offering a perfect backdrop for breathtaking photos.

The Moorea Dolphin Center allows visitors to swim and interact with these majestic creatures in a natural lagoon setting, providing an unforgettable experience for animal lovers of all ages.

Visitors to Moorea can partake in a variety of activities that cater to every interest and preference.

Snorkeling and diving enthusiasts can explore the island’s vibrant coral gardens and underwater marine life, while kayaking and paddleboarding offer opportunities to explore the island’s tranquil lagoons and hidden coves at a leisurely pace.

Hiking trails such as the Three Coconuts Pass and Mount Rotui provide stunning vistas of the surrounding landscapes and ample opportunities for outdoor adventure.

3. Huahine

Huahine

Huahine, known as the “Garden of Eden,” beckons travelers with its lush landscapes, rich cultural heritage, and tranquil ambiance.

Let’s explore the enchanting island of Huahine.

Huahine, located in the Leeward Islands of French Polynesia, is comprised of two main islands, Huahine Nui and Huahine Iti.

Spanning approximately 75 square kilometers, Huahine is renowned for its verdant hills, pristine beaches, and crystal-clear lagoons.

Huahine boasts an array of attractions and points of interest that showcase its natural beauty and cultural significance.

The Fare Potee Museum provides insight into the island’s history and traditions, displaying artifacts and exhibits that highlight its Polynesian heritage.

The sacred sites of Marae Farehape and Marae Anini offer glimpses into Huahine’s ancient past, serving as spiritual and cultural landmarks for the local community.

Visitors to Huahine can immerse themselves in a variety of activities that celebrate the island’s natural wonders and idyllic surroundings.

Snorkeling and diving enthusiasts can explore the vibrant coral reefs and marine life that thrive in the island’s pristine waters, while fishing charters offer opportunities to reel in a prized catch amidst stunning coastal scenery.

Kayaking and paddleboarding allow visitors to explore Huahine’s tranquil lagoons and hidden bays at their own pace, while hiking trails such as the Mount Turi and Maeva archaeological site provide panoramic views of the surrounding landscapes and opportunities for outdoor adventure.

4. Fakarava

Fakarava

Fakarava, a UNESCO Biosphere Reserve, mesmerizes visitors with its pristine coral reefs, vibrant marine life, and untouched natural beauty. Let’s explore the wonders of Fakarava.

Fakarava, located in the Tuamotu Archipelago of French Polynesia, is the second largest atoll in the world. Spanning approximately 1,112 square kilometers, Fakarava is renowned for its diverse ecosystems, including expansive lagoons, palm-fringed beaches, and dense mangrove forests.

Fakarava boasts an abundance of attractions and points of interest that showcase its unique natural environment and cultural heritage.

The Tetamanu Village, a traditional Polynesian settlement, offers visitors a glimpse into Fakarava’s rich history and way of life, with ancient marae, coral churches, and artisan workshops.

The Pink Sands of Rotoava Beach, a stunning stretch of shoreline known for its blush-colored sands and crystal-clear waters, beckon beachcombers and sun-seekers alike.

Visitors to Fakarava can partake in a variety of activities that celebrate the island’s pristine landscapes and marine ecosystems.

Snorkeling and diving enthusiasts can explore the kaleidoscopic coral gardens and vibrant underwater life of the UNESCO-listed South Pass, home to an array of marine species including sharks, manta rays, and tropical fish.

Kayaking and stand-up paddleboarding offer opportunities to explore Fakarava’s tranquil lagoons and mangrove forests, while guided nature walks and birdwatching tours provide insights into the island’s unique flora and fauna.

5. Nuku Hiva

Nuku Hiva

Nuku Hiva, the largest island in the Marquesas archipelago, boasts rugged landscapes, towering cliffs, and lush valleys, offering visitors a glimpse into the untamed beauty of French Polynesia.

Let’s embark on a journey to explore Nuku Hiva.

Nuku Hiva spans approximately 339 square kilometers, making it the largest island in the Marquesas archipelago.

Its dramatic landscapes, characterized by soaring peaks, deep valleys, and cascading waterfalls, create a paradise for outdoor enthusiasts and nature lovers alike.

Nuku Hiva is home to a wealth of attractions and points of interest that showcase its natural wonders and cultural heritage.

The Vaipo Waterfall, one of the tallest waterfalls in French Polynesia, plunges into a lush valley surrounded by verdant vegetation, offering a breathtaking sight for visitors.

The ancient archaeological sites of Hikokua and Taipivai Valley provide insights into Nuku Hiva’s rich history and Polynesian heritage, with stone platforms, petroglyphs, and ceremonial structures dating back centuries.

Visitors to Nuku Hiva can immerse themselves in a variety of activities that celebrate the island’s rugged landscapes and cultural traditions.

Hiking trails such as the Alakau and Hatiheu offer stunning vistas of the surrounding valleys and coastline, providing opportunities for outdoor adventure and exploration.

Cultural tours and traditional dance performances allow visitors to connect with the local community and learn about Nuku Hiva’s unique customs and traditions.

Additionally, horseback riding excursions, snorkeling trips, and boat tours offer memorable experiences for travelers seeking to discover the beauty of Nuku Hiva from land and sea.

6. Maupiti

Maupiti

Maupiti, a hidden gem of the Society Islands, entices visitors with its pristine beaches, turquoise lagoons, and laid-back atmosphere. Let’s uncover the beauty of Maupiti.

Maupiti, located just west of Bora Bora, is a small volcanic island spanning approximately 11 square kilometers.

Despite its compact size, Maupiti boasts a diverse landscape of lush valleys, verdant hillsides, and white-sand beaches, creating a picture-perfect paradise for travelers seeking tranquility and natural beauty.

Maupiti offers an array of attractions and points of interest that showcase its unspoiled landscapes and rich cultural heritage.

The Mount Teurafaatiu, the highest point on the island, offers panoramic views of the surrounding lagoon and neighboring islands, providing a stunning backdrop for hikers and nature enthusiasts.

The ancient marae of Maupiti, such as Marae Fareatea and Marae Manunu, serve as sacred sites and cultural landmarks, offering insights into Maupiti’s Polynesian heritage and spiritual traditions.

Visitors to Maupiti can partake in a variety of activities that celebrate the island’s pristine environment and idyllic surroundings.

Snorkeling and diving enthusiasts can explore the vibrant coral reefs and marine life that thrive in Maupiti’s crystal-clear lagoon, encountering colorful fish, rays, and reef sharks.

Kayaking and paddleboarding offer opportunities to explore the island’s tranquil bays and hidden coves, while boat tours and fishing charters provide memorable experiences for travelers seeking to discover Maupiti’s beauty from land and sea.

7. Tikehau

Tikehau

Tikehau, a serene atoll in the Tuamotu Archipelago, enchants visitors with its pristine beaches, vibrant coral reefs, and abundant marine life. Let’s explore the allure of Tikehau.

Tikehau, located northeast of Tahiti, is a picturesque atoll spanning approximately 26 square kilometers. Known for its shallow, turquoise lagoon and pink sand beaches, Tikehau epitomizes the quintessential South Pacific paradise.

Tikehau boasts an array of attractions and points of interest that showcase its natural beauty and ecological diversity.

The Pink Sands of Tikehau’s beaches, created by the crushed shells of tiny marine organisms, offer a stunning contrast against the azure waters of the lagoon, providing a perfect setting for leisurely strolls and sunset picnics.

The Tuheiava Pass, a renowned dive site, teems with colorful coral gardens, reef sharks, and tropical fish, offering unparalleled underwater exploration for snorkelers and divers alike.

Visitors to Tikehau can immerse themselves in a variety of activities that celebrate the island’s pristine environment and vibrant marine ecosystems.

Snorkeling excursions to the Blue Lagoon and Tikehau Aquarium allow visitors to encounter a dazzling array of marine life, including manta rays, dolphins, and sea turtles, amidst the crystal-clear waters of the lagoon.

Kayaking and paddleboarding offer opportunities to explore Tikehau’s tranquil lagoon and secluded motus, while guided nature walks and birdwatching tours provide insights into the island’s unique flora and fauna.

8. Rangiroa

Rangiroa

Rangiroa, the largest atoll in French Polynesia, beckons travelers with its stunning lagoons, diverse marine life, and idyllic beaches. Let’s delve into the allure of Rangiroa.

Rangiroa spans approximately 170 square miles, making it the largest atoll in French Polynesia and one of the largest in the world.

Its vast lagoon, encompassing over 1,100 square miles, is renowned for its crystal-clear waters, vibrant coral reefs, and abundant marine life, making it a paradise for snorkelers, divers, and nature enthusiasts alike.

Rangiroa boasts an array of attractions and points of interest that showcase its natural beauty and ecological diversity.

The Tiputa Pass, a renowned dive site, offers exhilarating drift dives amidst swirling currents, towering coral walls, and schools of colorful fish, providing an unforgettable underwater experience for divers of all levels.

The Blue Lagoon, a tranquil oasis of turquoise waters and pristine beaches, invites visitors to relax, swim, and snorkel in a secluded paradise surrounded by coconut palms and swaying pandanus trees.

Visitors to Rangiroa can partake in a variety of activities that celebrate the island’s natural wonders and laid-back atmosphere.

Snorkeling excursions to the Aquarium, a shallow coral garden teeming with tropical fish, rays, and reef sharks, offer opportunities for up-close encounters with marine life in their natural habitat.

Kayaking and paddleboarding allow visitors to explore Rangiroa’s tranquil lagoons and mangrove forests, while boat tours and fishing charters provide memorable experiences for travelers seeking to discover the beauty of Rangiroa from land and sea.

9. Taha’a

Taha’a

Taha’a, known as the “Vanilla Island,” captivates visitors with its fragrant plantations, turquoise lagoons, and authentic Polynesian charm. Let’s uncover the allure of Taha’a.

Taha’a, located just north of Raiatea, is a small island in the Society Islands of French Polynesia, spanning approximately 90 square kilometers.

Renowned for its fertile soil and abundant sunshine, Taha’a is the primary producer of vanilla in French Polynesia, earning it the nickname “Vanilla Island.”

Taha’a boasts an array of attractions and points of interest that showcase its natural beauty and cultural heritage.

The Vanilla Plantations, spread across the island’s lush valleys and hillsides, offer guided tours and tastings, allowing visitors to learn about the cultivation and production of vanilla and sample its exquisite flavors.

The Coral Gardens of Taha’a, located along the island’s pristine coastline, teem with colorful marine life and vibrant coral reefs, providing excellent snorkeling and diving opportunities for underwater enthusiasts.

Visitors to Taha’a can immerse themselves in a variety of activities that celebrate the island’s agricultural heritage and pristine environment.

Vanilla tours and tastings offer insights into Taha’a’s thriving vanilla industry and the traditional methods used to cultivate and harvest this prized spice.

Snorkeling and diving excursions to the Coral Gardens and nearby motus allow visitors to explore Taha’a’s vibrant underwater world, encountering tropical fish, rays, and sea turtles amidst the crystal-clear waters of the lagoon.

Kayaking and paddleboarding offer opportunities to explore Taha’a’s tranquil bays and hidden coves, while boat tours and fishing charters provide memorable experiences for travelers seeking to discover the beauty of Taha’a from land and sea.

10. Raiatea

Raiatea

Raiatea, the sacred island and cultural heart of French Polynesia, beckons travelers with its lush landscapes, ancient marae, and pristine waters. Let’s explore the enchanting island of Raiatea.

Raiatea, located in the Leeward Islands of French Polynesia, is the second largest island in the Society Archipelago, spanning approximately 167 square kilometers.

Revered as the “Sacred Island,” Raiatea is steeped in Polynesian mythology and cultural significance, making it a cherished destination for travelers seeking authenticity and spirituality.

Raiatea boasts an array of attractions and points of interest that showcase its natural beauty and cultural heritage.

The Taputapuatea Marae, a UNESCO World Heritage Site, serves as the spiritual center of Polynesia, with ancient stone platforms, ceremonial structures, and sacred artifacts that offer insights into Raiatea’s rich history and religious traditions.

The Faaroa River, the only navigable river in French Polynesia, winds its way through lush valleys and dense rainforests, providing a picturesque setting for kayak and boat tours amidst towering mountains and tropical foliage.

Visitors to Raiatea can immerse themselves in a variety of activities that celebrate the island’s cultural heritage and natural wonders.

Cultural tours and guided visits to the Taputapuatea Marae offer opportunities to learn about Raiatea’s ancient past and the significance of its sacred sites in Polynesian culture.

Snorkeling and diving excursions to the coral gardens of Motu Nao Nao and the underwater wonders of the Miri Miri Pass allow visitors to explore Raiatea’s vibrant marine life and colorful coral reefs.

Hiking trails such as the Mount Tapioi and Mount Temehani offer panoramic views of the surrounding landscapes and opportunities for outdoor adventure and exploration.

Conclusion

As we conclude our exploration of the 10 best islands in Tahiti, it’s evident that French Polynesia offers a treasure trove of natural wonders, cultural heritage, and unforgettable experiences.

Let’s recap our journey and offer recommendations for travelers seeking to discover the beauty and diversity of Tahiti.

From the majestic peaks of Tahiti and the pristine beaches of Moorea to the secluded paradise of Maupiti and the vibrant lagoons of Rangiroa, each island in Tahiti offers its own unique charm and allure.

Whether you’re seeking adventure, relaxation, or cultural immersion, there’s something for every traveler to discover in this tropical paradise.

  1. Tahiti: The heart of French Polynesia, Tahiti captivates visitors with its lush landscapes, vibrant culture, and array of attractions.
  2. Moorea: Known as the “Magical Island,” Moorea entices travelers with its dramatic landscapes, outdoor adventures, and rich cultural heritage.
  3. Huahine: The “Garden of Eden,” Huahine charms visitors with its lush valleys, sacred sites, and eco-friendly tourism initiatives.
  4. Fakarava: A UNESCO Biosphere Reserve, Fakarava invites travelers to explore its pristine coral reefs, untouched natural beauty, and authentic Polynesian culture.
  5. Nuku Hiva: The largest island in the Marquesas archipelago, Nuku Hiva offers rugged landscapes, ancient archaeological sites, and outdoor adventures.
  6. Maupiti: A hidden gem of the Society Islands, Maupiti captivates visitors with its fragrant plantations, turquoise lagoons, and laid-back atmosphere.
  7. Tikehau: Known as the “Pink Sands,” Tikehau mesmerizes travelers with its pristine beaches, vibrant coral reefs, and abundant marine life.
  8. Rangiroa: The largest atoll in French Polynesia, Rangiroa beckons with its stunning lagoons, diverse marine life, and idyllic beaches.
  9. Taha’a: The “Vanilla Island,” Taha’a enchants visitors with its fragrant plantations, turquoise lagoons, and authentic Polynesian charm.
  10. Raiatea: The sacred island and cultural heart of French Polynesia, Raiatea invites travelers to explore its ancient marae, lush landscapes, and spiritual sites.

For travelers planning a visit to Tahiti, we recommend exploring a combination of islands to truly experience the diversity and beauty of French Polynesia.

Consider embarking on island-hopping adventures to discover hidden gems, immerse yourself in local culture, and create unforgettable memories.

Tahiti’s beauty extends far beyond its pristine beaches and turquoise waters.

It’s a destination where nature and culture intertwine, where ancient traditions meet modern luxury, and where every moment is filled with wonder and awe.

As you journey through the islands of Tahiti, may you be inspired by the breathtaking landscapes, enriched by the vibrant culture, and captivated by the spirit of aloha that permeates this tropical paradise.

tahiti island

FAQ’s About the Best Islands in Tahiti and French Polynesia:

Which island is the best in Tahiti?

Determining the “best” island in Tahiti is subjective and depends on individual preferences.

Each island offers its own unique charm, from Tahiti’s vibrant culture to Bora Bora’s stunning overwater bungalows and Moorea’s lush landscapes.

It’s advisable to explore multiple islands to experience the diversity of French Polynesia.

Which is nicer Tahiti or Bora Bora?

Both Tahiti and Bora Bora offer unique experiences. Tahiti, as the largest island, provides a vibrant mix of culture, dining, and shopping.

Bora Bora, known for its iconic overwater bungalows and crystal-clear lagoon, is renowned for romantic getaways and luxury resorts.

The choice between the two depends on personal preferences and the type of experience you seek.

Can you island hop in Tahiti?

Yes, island hopping is a popular activity in Tahiti and French Polynesia.

Visitors can easily travel between islands by plane or ferry, allowing them to explore different landscapes, cultures, and attractions within the archipelago.

What is the most visited island in French Polynesia?

Bora Bora is often considered one of the most visited islands in French Polynesia due to its iconic overwater bungalows, stunning lagoon, and romantic ambiance.

It’s a favorite destination for honeymooners and luxury travelers seeking an unforgettable tropical getaway.

What is the least visited island in French Polynesia?

The least visited island in French Polynesia varies and may depend on factors such as accessibility, infrastructure, and promotion.

Some of the less-visited islands include the remote atolls of the Tuamotu Archipelago and the Marquesas Islands, which offer pristine natural beauty and authentic Polynesian culture but receive fewer tourists compared to popular destinations like Bora Bora and Moorea.

How many islands should I visit in French Polynesia?

The number of islands to visit in French Polynesia depends on your preferences, budget, and available time.

While it’s common for travelers to visit multiple islands during their trip, the ideal number depends on the duration of your stay and the experiences you wish to have.

Some travelers opt for a single destination, while others explore several islands to experience the diverse landscapes, cultures, and activities that French Polynesia has to offer.

How many days is enough in Tahiti?

The number of days needed in Tahiti depends on the activities you plan to do and the islands you wish to explore.

A minimum of three to four days allows for a basic exploration of Tahiti’s main attractions and cultural experiences.

However, to fully immerse yourself in the beauty and diversity of French Polynesia, consider spending at least a week or more to explore multiple islands and indulge in various activities.

What is nicer Fiji or Tahiti?

The preference between Fiji and Tahiti is subjective and depends on individual tastes and travel preferences.

Fiji is known for its stunning beaches, lush landscapes, and vibrant culture, while Tahiti offers a unique blend of Polynesian charm, luxury resorts, and crystal-clear lagoons.

Both destinations offer unforgettable experiences, and the choice between the two depends on the type of experience you seek and the activities you wish to indulge in.

Which part of Tahiti is the best?

The best part of Tahiti depends on your interests and preferences. Papeete, the capital city, offers vibrant markets, dining, and cultural experiences.

Moorea, a short ferry ride away, boasts lush landscapes, outdoor activities, and stunning vistas.

Bora Bora, known for its luxury resorts and overwater bungalows, offers unparalleled luxury and romance.

Each region of Tahiti offers its own unique charm and attractions, so the best part depends on what you’re looking to experience during your visit.

best islands in tahiti

(Island Expert)

Christian is a dynamic serial entrepreneur and a licensed real estate agent with a relentless passion for unlocking the potential of island real estate.Christian's expertise extends beyond entrepreneurship and property transactions.He possesses a profound expertise in crafting captivating content and persuasive copywriting tailored exclusively to the enchanting realm of island real estate.

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